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Lung Volumes and Capacities EXPLAINED UNDER 5 MINUTES!!!!

in the previous video we talked about

lung volumes and capacities today we're

going to take a closer look at them as

we mentioned previously lung volumes and

capacity is measured by spirometry the

first thing that we're going to take a

look at is called the TLC or the total

lung capacity total lung capacity is the

amount of gas in the lungs after a

maximal inspiration so if you take a

deep breath in and hold it the volume of

gas in your lungs is the total lung

capacity normally it's six liters for

adult males and 4.2 liters for adult

females next we're going to take a look

at vital capacity or VC vital capacity

is the amount of gas that can be exhaled

after a maximal inspiration so what you

do is take a deep breath all the way in

and then blow it all the way out and

that would be your vital capacity the

residual volume is the amount of gas

remaining in the lungs after a maximal

expiration so as you're sitting there

and you blow all the way out as far as

you can the amount of gas that remains

in the lungs is the residual volume

normally it makes up 20% of the total

lung capacity vital capacity plus

residual volume equals total lung

capacity tidal volume is the amount of

gas an individual inspires or expires

during normal quiet breathing so as you

sit there breathing normally in and out

that's your tidal volume it is seven to

eight percent of the total lung capacity

the inspiratory reserve volume is the

amount of gas that an individual can

inhale above a tidal inspiration so as

you're sitting there and you make a

normal tidal inspiration and then take a

deep breath all the way in as far as you

can that's your in

fitori reserved volume normally it's 60%

of the total lung capacity the

expiratory reserve volume is the amount

of gas that an individual can exhale

beyond a title expiration so as you're

sitting there and exhale normally and

then push all the gas out that you

possibly can

that's your expert or e-reserve volume

normally it's 20% of total lung capacity

tidal volume plus inspiratory reserve

volume plus expert ory reserve volume

equals vital capacity FRC or the

functional residual capacity is the

amount of gas remaining in the lungs

after a title expiration normally it is

40% of the total lung capacity there are

three different types of capacities the

first is the lung capacities it includes

inspiratory capacity which we're going

to discuss next the functional residual

capacity vital capacity and total lung

capacity the inspiratory capacity is the

amount of gas that an individual can

inhale starting at a title expiration so

as you breathe out normally and then

take a deep breath all the way in that's

the inspiratory capacity therefore it

includes the tidal volume and the

inspiratory reserve volume for instance

it would be smart to take an inspiratory

capacity before jumping in water so that

you can stay underwater longer normally

it is 60% of the total lung capacity and

finally going back to the functional

residual capacity this cannot be

measured directly with spirometry

because the residual volume or RV cannot

be exhaled the functional residual

volume is measured indirectly using

helium dilution or nitrogen washout

the functional residual volume includes

expert ory reserve

and the residual volume thank you for

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